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The Chronicles of Froissart

By: Jean Froissart

JEAN FROISSART, the most representative of the chroniclers of the later Middle Ages, was born at Valenciennes in 1337. The Chronicle which, more than his poetry, has kept his fame alive, was undertaken when he was only twenty; the first book was written in its earliest form by 1369; and he kept revising and enlarging the work to the end of his life. In 1361 he went to England, entered the Church, and attached himself to Queen Philippa of Hainault, the wife of Edward III,...

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Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences, Part One

By: Georg Hegel

Philosophy misses an advantage enjoyed by the other sciences. It cannot like them rest the existence of its objects on the natural admissions of consciousness, nor can it assume that its method of cognition, either for starting or for continuing, is one already accepted. The objects of philosophy, it is true, are upon the whole the same as those of religion. In both the object is Truth, in that supreme sense in which God and God only is the Truth. Both in like manner go ...

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Twice-Told Tales

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

There was once a time when New England groaned under the actual pressure of heavier wrongs, than those threatened ones which brought on the Revolution. James II., the bigoted successor of Charles the Voluptuous, had annulled the charters of all the colonies, and sent a harsh and unprincipled soldier to take away our liberties and endanger our religion. The administration of Sir Edmund Andros lacked scarcely a single characteristic of tyranny: a Governor and Council, hold...

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The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver

By: Edna Saint Vincent Millay

SON, said my mother, When I was knee-high, You've need of clothes to cover you, And not a rag have I. There's nothing in the house To make a boy breeches, Nor shears to cut a cloth with Nor thread to take stitches.

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Hymns of the Atharvaveda

By: Maurice Bloomfield

Excerpt: V, 22. Charm against takman (fever) and related diseases. 1. May Agni drive the takman away from here, may Soma, the press?stone, and Varuna, of tried skill; may the altar, the straw (upon the altar), and the brightly?flaming fagots (drive him away)! Away to naught shall go the hateful powers! 2. Thou that makest all men sallow, inflarning them like a searing fire, even now, O takman, thou shalt become void of strength: do thou now go away down, aye, into the de...

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Bayard : The Good Knight Without Fear and Without Reproach

By: Christopher Hare

Introduction: That courtesy title which flies to the mind whenever the name Bayard is mentioned??The Good Knight without Fear and without Reproach??is no fancy name bestowed by modern admirers, but was elicited by the hero?s merits in his own day and from his own people. The most valuable chronicle of the Good Knight?s life and deeds was written with charming simplicity by a faithful follower, who, in single?hearted devotion to his beloved master?s fame, took no thought ...

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The Ear in the Wall

By: Arthur Benjamin Reeve

Excerpt: I. THE VANISHER. ?Hello, Jameson, is Kennedy in?? I glanced up from the evening papers to encounter the square-jawed, alert face of District Attorney Carton in the doorway of our apartment. ?How do you do, Judge?? I exclaimed. ?No, but I expect him any second now. Won?t you sit down?? The District Attorney dropped, rather wearily I thought, into a chair and looked at his watch.

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The Gardener

By: Edward Frederic Benson

Excerpt: Two friends of mine, Hugh Grainger and his wife, had taken for a month of Christmas holiday the house in which we were to witness such strange manifestations, and when I received an invitation from them to spend a fortnight there I returned them an enthusiastic affirmative. Well already did I know that pleasant heathery country?side, and most intimate was my acquaintance with the subtle hazards of its most charming golf?links. Golf, I was given to understand, wa...

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Box and Cox

By: John Maddison Morton

Cox. I'vehalfa mind to register an oath that I'llnever havemy hair cut again! (His hair is very short.) I lookasifI had just been cropped for themilitia! AndI was particularly emphatic in my instructionsto thehair-dresser, only to cut the ends off. Hemust havethought I meant the other ends!Never mind-I shan'tmeetanybody to care aboutsoearly. Eight o'clock, I declare!I haven't a moment to lose. Fate hasplacedme with the most punctual, particularand peremptoryof hatters, a...

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The Ruins of the Abbey of Fitzmartin

Excerpt: THE Abbey of Fitz?Martin had been once famous for its riches and grandeur, and, as a monastery, was dedicated to St Catherine; but the subsequent irregularity of its order, together with the despotic tyranny of one of its ancient lords, had stripped it.

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Lord Beaupre

By: Henry James

Some reference had been made to Northerley, which was within an easy drive, and Firminger described how he had dined there the night before and had found a lot of people. MrsAshbury, one of the two visitors, inquired who these people might be, and he mentioned half-a-dozen names, among which was that of young Raddle, which had been a good deal on people's lips, and even in the newspapers, on the occasion, still recent, of his stepping into the fortune, exceptionally vast...

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Decoration Day

By: Sarah Orne Jewett

A WEEK before the 30th of May, three friends — John Stover and Henry Merrill and Asa Brown — happened to meet on Saturday evening at Barton's store at the Plains. They were enjoying this idle hour after a busy week. After long easterly rains, the sun had at last come out bright and clear, and all the Barlow farmers had been planting. There was even a good deal of ploughing left to be done, the season was so backward. The three middle-aged men were old friends. They had b...

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Irenaeus against Heresies, V3

Preface: THOU hast indeed enjoined upon me, my very dear friend, that I should bring to light the Valentinian doctrines, concealed, as their votaries imagine; that I should exhibit their diversity, and compose a treatise in refutation of them. therefore have undertaken showing that they spring from Simon, the father of all heretics to exhibit both their doctrines and successions, and to set forth arguments against them all. Wherefore, since the conviction of these men an...

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The Isle of Doubt

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: Chapter 1. WORD TO THE SHADOW ?BURBANK speaking.? The words were uttered by a man who was seated at a table in a tiny, gloomy room. A shaded lamp in the corner provided the sole illumination, and the dim light showed only the speaker?s back. The man at the table was listening intently through a pair of ear phones which were attached to his head. ?Await reply.? Burbank spoke in a quiet tone, after receiving the message over the wire. His hands stretched to the wa...

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The Case of Janissary

By: Arthur Morrison

Excerpt: IN the year 1897 a short report of an ordinary sort of inquest appeared in the London newspapers, and I here transcribe it. ?Dr. McCulloch held an inquest yesterday on the body of Mr. Henry Lawrence, whose body was found on Tuesday morning last in the river near Vauxhall Bridge. The deceased was well known in certain sporting circles. Sophia Lawrence, the widow, said that deceased had left home on Monday afternoon at about five, in his usual health, saying that ...

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War and Peace, Volume 13

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Man's mind cannot grasp the causes of events in their completeness, but the desire to find those causes is implanted in man's soul. And without considering the multiplicity and complexity of the conditions any one of which taken separately may seem to be the cause, he snatches at the first approximation to a cause that seems to him intelligible and says: This is the cause! In historical events (where the actions of men are the subject of observation) the first and most p...

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Germania and Agricola

By: Publius Cornelius (Gaius) Tacitus

Preface: This edition of the Germania and Agricola of Tacitus is designed to meet the following wants, which, it is believed, have been generally felt by teachers and pupils in American Colleges. 1. A Latin text, approved and established by the essential concurrence of all the more recent editors. The editions of Tacitus now in use in this country abound in readings purely conjectural, adopted without due regard to the peculiarities of the author, and in direct contraven...

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Old Age and Death

By: Jacques Casanova

Excerpt: APPENDIX AND SUPPLEMENT Whether the author died before the work was complete, whether the concluding volumes were destroyed by himself or his literary executors, or whether the MS. fell into bad hands, seems a matter of uncertainty, and the materials available towards a continuation of the Memoirs are extremely fragmentary. We know, however, that Casanova at last succeeded in obtaining his pardon from the authorities of the Republic, and he returned to Venice, w...

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Penelope's Postscripts

By: Kate Douglas Wiggin

Excerpt: PENELOPE IN SWITZERLAND. A DAY IN PESTALOZZI?TOWN. Salemina and I were in Geneva. If you had ever travelled through Europe with a charming spinster who never sat down at a Continental table d'hote without being asked by an American vis?a?vis whether she were one of the P.?s of Salem, Massachusetts, you would understand why I call my friend Salemina. She doesn't mind it. She knows that I am simply jealous because I came from a vulgarly large tribe that never had ...

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Realm of Doom

By: Maxwell Grant

Two men were standing near the center of the hotel lobby, watching the bellboy bring their suitcases from the elevator. To all appearances, they were a pair of motorists ending their stay in Charleston, West Virginia. The fact that they were checking out at six in the afternoon was not unusual. Many persons preferred to drive at night, and six o'clock was the time when guests had to leave or pay for another night's lodging. One man was tall, with light hair and eyes. His...

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